Source: New York Times

“The stock market is off to its best start since 1987, but these investors are expected to dump hundreds of billions of dollars of shares this year. So who is pushing prices higher? In part, the companies themselves. American corporations flush with cash from last year’s tax cuts and a growing economy are buying back their own shares at an extraordinary clip. They have good reason: Buybacks allow them to return cash to shareholders, burnish key measures of financial performance and goose their share prices. The surge in buybacks reflects a fundamental shift in how the market is operating, cementing the position of corporations as the single largest source of demand for American stocks. The binge has helped sustain a bull market approaching its 10th birthday, even in the face of political, international and economic uncertainty….In the fourth quarter last year, American companies bought an estimated $240 billion of their own shares, according to an analysis by the Goldman Sachs team that handles stock buybacks for major companies. That’s nearly 60 percent higher than during the same period in 2017….Traditional investors like mutual funds, pensions, endowments and individuals are expected to be net sellers, parting with roughly $400 billion in shares.”

The risk of loss in the trading of stocks, options, futures, forex, foreign equities, and bonds can be substantial and is not suitable for all investors. Trading on margin or the use of leverage is not suitable for all investors and losses exceeding your initial deposit is possible. Supporting documentation is available upon request. Trading futures, options on futures, and FX involves substantial risk of loss and is not suitable for all investors. Carefully consider whether trading is suitable for you in light of your circumstances, knowledge, and financial resources and only risk capital should be used. Opinions, market data, and recommendations are subject to change at any time. The lower the margin used the higher the leverage and therefore increases your risk. Past performance is not necessarily indicative of future results.