Authored by Karl Montevirgen via InsideFutures

Bitcoin has become an object of immense, if not entirely frenzied, focus. Considering its stratospheric rise (5,500% since 2013), the polarized rhetoric surrounding its legitimacy, the seemingly manic governmental responses and counter-actions across the globe, and now, the announcement that the CME will be offering Bitcoin Futures by years end, its no surprise that Bitcoin has been soaking up all the limelight.

But Bitcoin is not the only game in town. An arguably libertarian response to the 2008 global financial crisis, Bitcoin (and all cryptocurrencies for that matter) may eventually become subject to the sharp-elbowed competition that constitutes every genuine free-market arena. And as legendary investor Jim Rogers mentioned in a recent interview with Business Insiders Henry Blodget, things always start where we’re not looking. In other words, potential opportunities and catastrophes creep up on us from our blind spots (and it’s not that we cant see whats coming; its that we cant easily recognize what we see).

In the case of cryptomarkets, the blind spot is huge. There are over 100 cryptocurrencies, not counting those currently in development. But assessing this blind spot can be tricky, as there is no direct model that can take into account the specific fundamental conditions–technological, ideological, geopolitical–that contributed to cryptocurrency emergence; conditions that continue to sustain and drive momentum toward its speculation, investment, and use.

In short, assessing the cryptomarket phenomenon–what might constitute a disruptive innovation–is exceedingly difficult as it not only transforms the ground upon which it must be assessed, but also reorganizes the fundamental principles, structures, and connections through which we define or recognize that ground.

Despite the variables and sketchy projections, we can, at the least, view easily-accessible market data–e.g. market capitalization, price, average trading volume–to get a sense of capital flows in or out of certain digital currencies.

Heres a list of the top 10 cryptocurrencies by market cap (as of November 1, 2017):

Source: Coinmarketcap.com

Disclaimer: the following data is NOT a recommendation for investment; it is merely a presentation of current statistics.

1. Bitcoin

  • Market Cap: $110,120,260,650
  • Price: $6,610.45
  • YTD: 586.0%

2. Ethereum

  • Market Cap: $28,522,030,732
  • Price: $298.78
  • YTD: 3521.6%

3. Bitcoin Cash

  • Market Cap: $8,331,292,506
  • Price: $497.32
  • YTD: -211.8%

4. Ripple

  • Market Cap: $7,588,015,960
  • Price: $0.16
  • YTD: 2566.7%

5. Litecoin

  • Market Cap: $2,932,908,055
  • Price: $54.68
  • YTD: 1112.4%

6. Dash

  • Market Cap: $2,094,149,720
  • Price: $273.5
  • YTD: 2,342.0%

7. BitConnect

  • Market Cap: $1,800,790,178
  • Price: $245.13
  • YTD: 153,106.3%

8. NEO

  • Market Cap: $1,734,551,000
  • Price: $26.69
  • YTD: 18,964.3%

9. NEM

  • Market Cap: $1,564,506,000
  • Price: $0.17
  • YTD: 5,566.7%

10. Monero

  • Market Cap: $1,302,446,587
  • Price: $85.15
  • YTD: 517.5%

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